Student Group of the Year Acceptance Speech, Take Two

The following is a blog post I wrote for Students For Liberty’s website:

Last weekend, my club at Berkeley was honored with the Students For Liberty Student Group of the Year Award at the fourth annual International Conference. The win came as quite a shock to me; indeed, so much so that I barely gave an acceptance speech. Overcome by the surreality of the moment, I stumbled on then off the stage without clearly articulating myself. Thus, I would like to use this blog post to both express proper thanks and give a few words of wisdom to other clubs striving to promote liberty at their university.

First, I would like to greatly thank Students For Liberty for the incredible support they have provided to my club over the two years of its existence. I can honestly say that my club would not have been as successful if it wasn’t for the constant influx of resources SFL has sent our way. From their free books project to their protest grants, my club has truly been empowered by SFL. This was not only a major contributing factor to our success, but also inspired me to personally become active in the organization as a Campus Coordinator.

Next, I would like to give two bits of advice– one for starting clubs and one for established organizations. Regarding the former, I call upon students who are considering starting such a group to be steadfast and dedicated in their mission. Three years ago, I thought that founding a libertarian organization at UC Berkeley, one of the most notoriously leftist campuses in the country, would be social suicide. However, after a little work, I was inspired to see how many liberty-oriented students were hiding at my school, awaiting for such an organization to be created. Indeed, the light of liberty can shine at even in some of the most hostile of campuses. All that is needed is dedication to the cause. And, trust me, the reward is much worth the risk. Starting my club has genuinely been one of the most defining moments of my life, shaping my college experience in such a positive way. So, get out there and spark the fight for freedom at your university!

For those established student organizations, I would like to make a call to blogging. To my understanding, there are only two libertarian college clubs that maintain an active website– my own and University of Nevada, Reno’s Students for Liberty. Blogging is a fantastic way to disseminate the philosophy of liberty and draw attention to your club. Indeed, not only does my club’s blog now receive over 1000 hits monthly, but also several of our past speakers first expressed interest in lecturing to us after stumbling upon our website. In the age of the Internet, social media is a great way to demonstrate your organization’s presence and relevance on your campus. Thus, I encourage you start the college libertarian blogging revolution!

With those words of wisdom, my second acceptance is concluded. Again, I would like to thank Students For Liberty and encourage everyone to get out there and promote liberty. If we can do it at Berkeley, you can do it anywhere!